Fire doors explained in under two minutes

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We often encounter everyday objects without knowing how they truly work or by what mechanism they operate, as is the case with fire doors for example. Fire doors are commonplace in all kinds of residential, institutional and industrial buildings and

WHAT IS A FIRE DOOR?

Fire doors reduce the spread of flames and smoke in the event of a fire, and are very useful in minimizing the risk of personnel injury and material damage. Fire doors, along with fire alarms, flame arresters and manual fire alarm boxes, are used as part of a passive fire protection system to contain a fire and slow the spread of flames and smoke. Fire doors are often found in public buildings or facilities with a high risk of fire to protect occupants from smoke and toxic fumes.

FIRE DOORS WITH ACTUATED SAFETY DEVICES?

Most fire doors are equipped with an actuated safety device mechanism, coupling its electromagnetic hold/release system to the fire alarm system. The fire door is held open until automatically released in the event of a fire, and can be manually re-opened and returned to its original position by pressing a button. These systems are either fail-safe (energize-to-hold) or fail-secure (energize-to-release). Fire doors with actuated safety devices are subject to a number of regulations to ensure the best fire-resistance rating.

WHY USE ELECTROMAGNETIC DOOR HOLDERS FOR FIRE DOORS?

Electromagnetic door holders operate using energize-to-hold or energize-to-release solenoids mounted in a metal casing. They are designed to safely hold open a fire door and to release it in the event of a fire to create compartments thus reducing its spread throughout the building. The electromagnet binds to a contact plate mounted on either a fixed or an articulated armature, and casings can be provided with or without a signal button. Cylindrical holding solenoids are compatible with actuated safety devices and are ideal for fire door hold/release systems compliant with current French standards.

Fire doors explained in under two minutes

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